when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

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falkor
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when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

Post by falkor » Wed May 11, 2016 6:18 pm

Vulnerability/age of suspect : interviewing juveniles i.e those aged 17 or under etc
The use of voluntary attendance should always be considered for children (aged 17 and under) who are suspected of having committed an offence. They must have an Appropriate Adult (AA) present during their interview – Code C11.15. Code C1.5A extends this requirement to 17 year old suspects.

“A juvenile or a person who is mentally disordered or otherwise mentally vulnerable must not be interviewed regarding their involvement or suspected involvement in a criminal offence or offences, or asked to provide or sign a written statement under caution or record of interview in the absence of the appropriate adult.”

A Child at Risk Form must also be completed and submitted prior to termination of duty. Where a person is under the influence of drink or drugs they should not be invited to attend the police station for a voluntary interview. Where a person has mental health issues they should not be interviewed voluntarily without the presence of an AA and consideration should be given to contacting Criminal Justice Liaison and Diversion mental health professionals .
I worked in the MET POLICE for 30 years and saw very little use made of Voluntary Interviews even for Juveniles, when I transferred to Surrey Police 10 years ago suddenly I saw almost a reversal, there was a huge use of Voluntary Interviews and as you see above, interviewing juveniles should be by Voluntary Interview in most cases but interestingly there are bars on Mental Health without AA and bars on / Drugs/ Drink - fair comment ! :slead:

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Re: when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

Post by powdermonkey » Wed May 11, 2016 7:18 pm

Apart from requiring an appropriate adult, one reason for using VA's in my force is the necessity for arrest. As an example, a colleague recently detained a 16 yr old with a spliff. PC attended & chose the VA route. The spliff had been seized, he'd been searched with nothing else found so VA was an appropriate route. I doubt the experience will have made the lad give up drugs but if I lived where he lived I'd probably be on drugs as well. The area makes a sh*thole look like a 5 star resort.
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Re: when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

Post by falkor » Thu May 12, 2016 8:05 pm

PC attended & chose the VA route. what was the result PM? he took a caution?

depressing reading :sloop: poor kid

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Re: when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

Post by powdermonkey » Thu May 12, 2016 8:43 pm

Yep. He took a youth caution I believe. Don't feel sorry for the kid. It's him, his mates and others like him who've helped turn the area into the sh*thole it is. My colleague knows the family. Mum & dad both work, older sister is a nurse and older brother is at uni studying accountancy. He wastes his evenings hanging around with his "crew" (or whatever the latest brain dead phrase is) smoking weed.
We had some fun with him though. We'd sneaked up on them in an unmarked car, a Toyota Auris, which isn't the normal police car; these lot usually know an unmarked police car from hundreds of yards away. Anyway, I digress, he was very interested in the Auris & we told him it was a special police spec and that it had a button on the dash which, when pressed, made the headlights fold away to reveal 2 machine guns. He believed us and was crouched down at the front looking at the headlamps. Until I flicked them on to full beam and half blinded him! His mates p*ssed themselves laughing at him and his stupidity.
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Re: when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

Post by falkor » Tue Jun 07, 2016 10:39 pm

this is very heartening. to hear a PCSO is part of working with a PC on a plain car is good news.

where I work the PCSOs are more likely to be on a DV car. "Domestic Violence" is being treated more seriously than ever where I am. Obviously PCSOs will not be the initial response to a DV (well I hope not anyway) but they do form a massive part of the next "POLICE REACTION" following attendance of PCs, who decide whether an arrest happens or not, once that decision is made a PCSO can come in and do hours of police work that previously a PC would have done, knocking on neighbours doors - even taking an MG11 as examples

so you mentioned "THE SPLIFF" offence as one case for VA, can you describe another? :slch2:

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Re: when interviewing juveniles .. mental health? drugs? drink?

Post by powdermonkey » Wed Jun 08, 2016 7:39 pm

I think I may not have explained the incident very well - it was another PCSO I was with as he has a driving permit & that was the car he was using on that occasion.

Can't think of any other VA's I've been involved with, but I hear them mentioned regularly in the office. If there's no necessity to arrest at the time, why not VA? It frees up a cell, the officer, and the offender is unlikely to have an appropriate adult with them at the time. Making an appointment is good also in that the offender has a few days of apprehension in waiting to be dealt with.

As for DV. As you say we'll not be first responder. But only the other night I came across a couple having a right verbal ding dong in their front garden. I tried to keep them calm & apart whilst shouting up for a unit. Outcome was that the bloke got arrested as she had alleged he gripped her with both hands around the throat. He has previous arrests for DV on her yet they've been together 2 years. I did house to house and all said they regularly argue then kiss and make up. And yes, alcohol is involved. I don't know if he was charged with the latest one as I'm on rest days now.
I have seen the truth and it makes no sense.

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