First aid training---real life?

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Is the supplied first aid training fit for purpose?

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dilly day dream
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Post by dilly day dream » Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:34 pm

PCSO Stuart Burt
is this our Stu ???????????????????????????????????
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stu
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Post by stu » Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:55 pm

Hi dilly and a merry christmas to you and everyone on here.

Yeah it was me, right place at the right time and just glad my first aid training paid off.
Remember he who dare's wins (only fools and horses)

What you see is not always what you get!

COBO
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FA

Post by COBO » Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:30 am

Well done Stu!

I must admit that after my PCSO FA course, I was fairly confident about dealing with the majority of incidents..but only 6 months later, I had already forgotten a great deal! I asked my skipper if I could have a formal or informal 'refresher' FA session but was told that this would not be considered due to cost (despite several other PCSO's asking for the same).

So I revised up at home and asked my mate who works as a nurse for some help...and just as well as a few months later I saw a woman step awkwardly off the kerb and dislocate her knee badly. She was screaming in pain, her boyfriend was panicking and with some surprise I went straight into action without a second thought, and all the training came out! I was particularly proud when remembering from my training she would shortly go into shock before amb arrived, I asked a fellow officer to fetch some blankets from a nearby bed and breakfast and 5 mins later she went into shock and we were already sorted with blankets to put upon her and under her head till amb arrived 15 mins later!

Personally I think we should have refresher FA training every year...
Cheers

Cobo

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CIDB
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Post by CIDB » Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:16 pm

Stu,

I had to let Falk know about this story.

You have done us all proud...

Well done again mate.

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stu
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Post by stu » Wed Dec 26, 2007 11:38 am

Right place at the right time and with anything in life a bit of luck. Ive just found out the chap is making a good recovery. Great news and just glad i was able to help. Hope everyone is having a great christmas.

(The pic didnt get my good side lol)
Remember he who dare's wins (only fools and horses)

What you see is not always what you get!

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Headset 57
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Post by Headset 57 » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:13 pm

Stu, your fame has spread wide and far:




PCSO saves a mans life 27/12/2007





Hospital consultant confirms that the man 'would not be alive had it not been for the officers' quick response to the situation'...

[/color]


PCSO Burt was tutoring a colleague PCSO Maynard in Broadwalk, Harlow last Friday December. Whilst on patrol he was alerted by a family member that a man had collapsed. Stuart attended to the man whilst instructing his colleague to call for an ambulance.

PCSO Stuart Burt said: "I placed the man on his back and saw immediately that he was very grey, I was extremely concerned as I could not find a breath or a pulse, his lips were turning blue. I thought he had already died. I started CPR on him and for about 25 seconds nothing happened and by now I was really worried for him. I gave a hard push on his chest area and the man gave an inward gasp. I can't express to you how I felt at that point, it was extremely emotional. I placed him in the recovery position until the ambulance crew arrived to take over.



Local shoppers were amazing, they also helped by protecting the mans head area by placing blankets so he was comfortable.

After the incident PCSO Stuart Burt resumed his patrols in the town.

Later in the day Harlow police switchboard operators took a call from a consultant at the resus department at Princess Alexandra Hospital stating: "How much he appreciated the officers quick actions, that the thump on the chest started the mans heart again, he would not be alive had it not been for the officers quick response to the situation."

PCSO Burt said: "I think anyone who come across a situation like that would have done the same thing, I am just glad that I was in the right place at the right time to help. I hope the man is still doing ok, I was going to visit him at the hospital but I didn't want to intrude on him and his family. I wish them all a safe and peaceful Christmas."

Source
http://www.policeoracle.com/news/PCSOs- ... 15188.html
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stu
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Post by stu » Sun Dec 30, 2007 1:20 am

Thanks for posting the comments mate, i didnt realise how far the story had spread. Im sure anyone else in that situation would of done the same thing and helped. Im glad to say the gentleman is now recovering well at home.

By the way im the slightly smaller and older pcso in the pic lol!
Remember he who dare's wins (only fools and horses)

What you see is not always what you get!

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Big Brother
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Post by Big Brother » Sun Dec 30, 2007 11:56 am

We were given first aid training for dealing with heavy bleeding, head injuries, spinal injuries and broken bones, as well as the standard stuff for CPR e.t.c.
I've used it a few times and it's worked a treat.
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oli
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Post by oli » Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:42 am

I wondered since I had my training whether I would remember what I learnt and in the heat of the moment it all comes flooding back.
Would be good to have some sort of defib training though considering I work in gods waiting room... :lol:

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falkor
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Post by falkor » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:19 pm

A HARLOW PSCO saved a man's life after he collapsed in Harlow town centre.

[img]http://pcsos-national.co.uk/pimages/sul ... 164727.jpg[/img] PCSO Stuart Burt (left) with PCSO Chris Maynard

Police Community Support Officer Stuart Burt was tutoring a colleague when the man's family asked for help after he had stopped breathing in Broad Walk on Friday December 21.

PSCO Burt lost no time in applying CPR while they waited for an ambulance.


"I placed the man on his back and saw immediately that he was very grey," he said. "I was extremely concerned as I could not find a breath or a pulse and his lips were turning blue. I thought he had already died.

"I started CPR on him and for about 25 seconds nothing happened and by now I was really worried for him. I gave a hard push on his chest area and the man gave an inward gasp."

He added: "I can't express to you how I felt at that point, it was extremely emotional. I placed him in the recovery position until the ambulance crew arrived to take over."

A consultant at the Princess Alexandra Hospital called Harlow Police later in the day to express gratitude to PSCO Burt for saving the man's life with his quick response.

PCSO Burt said: "I think anyone who came across a situation like that would have done the same thing, I am just glad that I was in the right place at the right time to help.

"I hope the man is still doing okay, I was going to visit him at the hospital, but I didn't want to intrude on him and his family. I wish them all a safe and peaceful Christmas.

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stu
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Post by stu » Sat Jan 05, 2008 1:28 am

Would be good if everyone took a first aid course. You never know when you will need it. I have heard comments from people saying "first aid cpr doesnt always work" but surely its better to have tried to help someone rather then just standing there or walking past.

(Just my personal point of view).
Remember he who dare's wins (only fools and horses)

What you see is not always what you get!

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jedrick999
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Post by jedrick999 » Sat Jan 05, 2008 8:02 pm

Well done stu!

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ASBO MAN
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Post by ASBO MAN » Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:17 pm

I wish my experience of giving CPR had a happy ending, sadly it did not and it took me quite some time to stop blaming myself for the outcome.

I had just finished a late shift and was driving home when I saw a vehicle stationary on my side of the road but facing towards me. I realised somthing was wrong and stopped to offer some assistance, fortunately I had my Police radio with me.

Having got to the car I saw that another member of the public had also stopped and was leaning in over the driver. I heard him say " He's got a pulse but is not breathing".
I did a quick assesment and was happy that no collision had taken place the driver had collapsed at the wheel, I called for assistance and we got the driver out of the car and laid him down on the ground. The other chap started chest compressions and I went to give mouth to mouth. I shone my torch on the drivers face so I could check for airway obstructions . It was then that I recognised the man as being one of my work mates on the local Neighbourhood Policing team.

To be honest I froze with shock for a few seconds and then the training kicked in,
We were joined by a doctor who was driving past and a quick responce paramedic. We all worked on my friend for about 15 minutes untill an ambulance got to the scene.

Sadly for my friend he was brain stem dead after a massive cranial bleed and there was nothing that could be done for him. Of course we did not know thta at the time and when it was all over and he had gone off in the ambulance I started to feel really sad and questioned what I had done and could it have been done differently.

It has taken a considerable time to get over, I put a brave face on at work and all my mates had nothing but praise for me. The funeral was very emotional and was very well attended, a little while later I spoke with his wife and she told me there was nothing anyone could have done to save him, that made me feel a whole lot better.

The experience has not put me off, I would do exactly the same again should the need ever arise which I hope it does not.
CHAOS,PANIC, AND DISORDER !!! AT LAST MY WORK HERE IS DONE

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jonny121
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Post by jonny121 » Mon Feb 04, 2008 6:32 pm

i administer CPR for 20 minutes yesterday for the 1st time whilst on duty and mine didn't have a happy ending either. so ASBO man i know how you felt as i have that feeling as well

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abdi1234
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Post by abdi1234 » Mon Feb 04, 2008 7:25 pm

For all the Met CSOs you can do a Met first aid at work course which lasts a week. I did mine a couple of weeks ago and we had a couple of CSOs there as well.

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